image
image
image
image
image
image
image
  • Fine Tissue Structure Fine Tissue Structure Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) images of fresh-frozen human skin biopsies. Fine tissue structures, including microscopic pockets of lipids, can be discerned with sub-micrometer resolution without using stains, dyes, or chemical fixing agents.
  • Fine Tissue Structure Fine Tissue Structure Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) images of fresh-frozen human skin biopsies. Fine tissue structures, including microscopic pockets of lipids, can be discerned with sub-micrometer resolution without using stains, dyes, or chemical fixing agents.
  • Hi-resolution array of TMA spots High resolution FT-IR spectroscopic imaging of 600 micron diameter prostate cores can be used to investigate spectroscopic and morphological differences between benign and cancerous tissue at the cellular level. Hi-resolution array of TMA spots
  • Image Classifier Image Classifier This model provides a mapping between the spectroscopic data collected using chemical imaging, and cell types in the tissue sample. Once this model is built, it can be used to classify future spectroscopic images.

     
image
The Bhargava laboratory uses chemical imaging and designed structures to understand molecular composition and function in a range of problems. The activities in the group are divided broadly into three categories: theory, modeling, and simulations (fundamental science); instrumentation and analysis algorithms (applied engineering); and applications of the first two to a range of problems, notably in cancer pathology, polymeric systems, and food grain analysis (translational activities). From an analytical technique perspective, we are involved in many aspects of mid-infrared and Raman (including stimulated and surface enhanced) spectroscopy. We are particularly interested in microscopy and tomography using these optical spectroscopic techniques. In cancer pathology, we are interested in developing new imaging technology to use molecular changes in the tumor and its microenvironment for better diagnoses, using an integrated approach we term “systems pathology.” The development of systems pathology comes from both a bottoms-up approach in using 3D cell cultures, computer simulations, and engineered tumor models using 3D printing as well as a top-down approach using human clinical samples and tissue microarrays. The approach is applied to prostate, breast, and colon cancers.

Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work, the laboratories are located in the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, and Carle Foundation Hospital at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

image

image

[8/2016] Seth Kenkel has been selected as a trainee for the new NIH-supported Tissue Microenvironment training program. Congratulations, Seth!

[7/2016] Beckman Insitute Postdoctoral Fellow Tomasz Wrobel featured for his research with chemical imaging for prostate cancer diagnostics.

[6/2016] Bhargava named director of the Cancer Community @ Illinois.

[5/2016] Saumya Tiwari has been selected as a Nadine Barrie Smith Memorial Fellowship recipient. Congratulations, Saumya!

[4/2016] Bhargava group receives funding from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to develop prostate cancer imaging.

[10/2015] Sweedler, Gillette and Bhargava awarded BRAIN Initiative grant to develop new cross-disciplinary tools for brain characterization at the cellular level.

[6/2015] Prabuddha Mukherjee and Rohit Bhargava, in collaboration with Dipanjan Pan and Santosh Misra, are involved in research to produce carbon nanoparticles that can be used for biomedical purposes [“Biomedical breakthrough: Carbon nanoparticles you can make at home” (Illinois News Bureau)]

[5/2015] Rohit Bhargava speaks at event announcing new graduate cancer program [“University of Illinois announces graduate cancer program” (willradio.tv.online); “University collaborates with Carle for Cancer Community program” (The Daily Illini)]

[4/2015] Rohit Bhargava sits on panel at celebration of Blue Waters supercomputer [“Celebrating Blue Waters” (National Center for Supercomputing Applications); National Center for Supercomputing Applications Facebook page: Blue Waters]

 

 

 
University of Illinois President-Designate Timothy Killeen visited the Beckman Institute in January and talked with Cancer Scholar Pierce Hadley and Rohit Bhargava about Pierce's experience in the program.  
President-Designate Killeen was presented with a Cancer Scholars t-shirt during his visit.